DoNorth

Straight from the North Country

Discover a CSA, creamery, and brewery, all located on the same road. Written by Pat Willisch and Adam St. Pierre

(DoNorth/Cassidy Backus and Jessica Blondell)

When visiting the North Country, it’s easy to buy groceries at the local supermarket. With plenty of local farmers in the area, however, it’s also easy and more interesting to buy straight from the producer. Mace Chasm Road in Keeseville, New York has local dairy, meats, veggies and beer, without the crowded and monotonous feel of a corporate retailer.

It’s not just the taste of local food and drink that make these experiences worthwhile, but a unique atmosphere and a behind-the-scenes look at how your food came to be.

The road is a 5-mile stretch starting off Route 9 and ending in the renowned waterfalls and caves of AuSable Chasm.

A one-stop shop for visitors, the road is home to a butchery, creamery and brewery. You’ll find crops without GMOs or pesticides, animals that are rotationally grazed and craft beer made with local ingredients.

Why not give the local approach a shot? Here are a few local stops on the Mace Chasm Road:


North Country Creamery

931 Mace Chasm Road

Owners Ashlee Kleinhammer & Steven Googin take pride in their Animal Welfare Approved dairy. The grass-fed cows roam happily while customers shop for farmstead cheeses, creamline yogurts, and milk. Two years ago, Kleinhammer and Googin opened up the Clover Mead Cafe, a blue building directly in front of the barn. Inside, chalkboard menus list breakfast, lunch and drink specials that utilize local ingredients. On a nice day, customers can take their crepe benedict, cocoa merengues, homemade soup or any other meal of the week to an outdoor picnic table. Their best-selling products are raw milk and camembert cheese. Raw milk, which hasn’t been pasteurized or homogenized, lasts seven to 10 days and has a thicker consistency than the stuff you pick up at the store. Worker Berlin Krebs says it tastes incredible in a milkshake. Kreps says the cheese is “kind of like brie, it’s really bloomy,” with a creamy texture.


Mace Chasm Farm

810 Mace Chasm Road

 Mace Chasm Farm has a distinct North Country appeal to it. Unlike the endlessly flat fields of the great plains, this farm is bordered with layers of conifer trees and views of Adirondack peaks stretching for miles. No wonder the animals here are happy. Of course, happy animals usually means tasty meats.The farmers raise cattle, sheep, chicken, turkeys and pigs, all of which are grazed in rotation, which helps tend the land, optimize grass growth and satisfy the animals.Between Tuesdays and Fridays, you can stop by Mace Chasm Farm’s butcher shop for a range of meat cuts or eggs straight from the animal to the butcher. The farm also has a somewhat odd honor system. If you want to buy something and they’re not there, you can write down what you picked up from the freezer and leave the money in a basket. 

 


Ausable Brewing Company

765 Mace Chasm Road

The brewery is a red house adjacent to an outdoor pavilion where there is sometimes live music and an outdoor bar. Owned by the Badger family, Ausable Brewing is a great place to meet new people and enjoy the craft side of beer. They have beer for all kinds of people. If you like a Budweiser type of beer, they have an amber ale called the North Country Common. If you drink pilsners like Stella Artois, there’s the Plowman’s Lunch. If you’re feeling adventurous, you can try one of their specialty brews. They range from Scotch Ales to rare brews like the Sour Cherry Brett. Every Thursday, they team up with Mace Chasm Farm for Taco night. Mace Chasm Farm opens up a taco stand with fresh ingredients, providing for a relaxing night. This event can get so packed that anywhere from 300 to 500 people can arrive in one night, says Dan Badger. On Fridays, they have a BBQ night where Ryan Weidenbach, opens up Dubb’s, a food stand based in Peru, New York. For authentic Mexican tacos, you can visit them Saturday for Poco Mas Tacos, a company founded in California. 

  Issue 6: Winter/Spring

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