DoNorth

Country Dreamin’

By Zachary Jackson Steering Business Locally At first glance, Country Dreams Farm looks fairly commonplace. A sprawling field of corn sways slowly at the entrance, while chickens and roosters scatter about. Pygmy and fainting goats hop and prance enthusiastically, bleating back and forth. Towering Belgian horses and miniature donkeys lazily graze undisturbed while farm workers finish daily chores. Melissa Monty-Provost and George Weidle are the faces behind the farm. They are in charge of day-to-day operations like feeding and caring for the animals. Monty-Provost bought the 85-acre farm on Pellerin Road in Plattsburgh 25 years ago. She did some hobby…

By Zachary Jackson

(DoNorth/Zachary Jackson)

Steering Business Locally

At first glance, Country Dreams Farm looks fairly commonplace. A sprawling field of corn sways slowly at the entrance, while chickens and roosters scatter about. Pygmy and fainting goats hop and prance enthusiastically, bleating back and forth. Towering Belgian horses and miniature donkeys lazily graze undisturbed while farm workers finish daily chores.
Melissa Monty-Provost and George Weidle are the faces behind the farm. They are in charge of day-to-day operations like feeding and caring for the animals. Monty-Provost bought the 85-acre farm on Pellerin Road in Plattsburgh 25 years ago. She did some hobby farming before buying Country Dreams Farm, but not on this scale. The property was previously owned as a farm, but the land had not been actively cultivated in a number of years. Since their purchase, Monty-Provost and Weidle have restored the farm and supplemented the property by adding some buildings. They restored the original 1950s barn and added a blacksmith shop and a gift shop.
Country Dreams Farm puts a heavy emphasis on supporting local businesses in and around Plattsburgh, even competitors.
“I want to be able to send you to places like Valcour Brewing Company or Oval Brewing Company, or one of the many wineries in the area instead of sending them to Vermont or larger Adirondack towns,” explains Monty-Provost.
She also believes in order to keep local businesses afloat, businesses have to support one another instead of having a cutthroat attitude about earning a customer’s dollar.
“We all kind of know one another,” Monty-Provost says. “We all work together for the betterment of the Adirondack Coast area. If you want to visit farms, we can offer you five farms, not just one.”
Although keeping the business alive is the main priority, Country Dreams Farm looks to their neighbors for supplying items that they can’t produce themselves. For example, instead of tapping trees for sap to make their own maple syrup, they support another local business, Sacred Roots Maple in West Chazy, to provide fresh maple syrup.

“I’m not a fan of supporting outside agriculture,” Monty-Provost says. “My philosophy is, when someone asks, ‘what is local?’ local is in my neighborhood. We try to source and buy everything local as much as we can.”

The farm’s products range from produce to honey and homemade jams and jellies.
Aside from providing local goods to consumers, Country Dreams Farms tries to show everyone a good time while on the farm by hosting events like birthday parties, weddings and corporate meetings.

Fall is the busiest time on the farm. Weidle and Monty-Provost ramp-up production to accommodate a corn maze, horse- and tractor-drawn wagon rides and a pumpkin patch. They even make homemade doughnuts for visitors to munch on while strolling about.
They don’t miss a beat transitioning into their other busy season: winter. The farm is at the mercy of the elements during the wintertime. Other than making sure the animals on the farm are tended to, the chores lessen and the pair focus their efforts elsewhere.
Monty-Provost and Weidle run sleigh rides at John Brown Farm in Lake Placid, with an 18-passenger sleigh that was made at Country Dreams Farm. Like many businesses in the North Country, Country Dreams depends on a good winter for their business to thrive. If it doesn’t snow, they don’t make money.
“Zero degrees with snow is a perfect scenario for us,” Monty-Provost says.
That may seem far from paradise to the average person, but making memories that last a lifetime is worth spending thirty minutes in the cold and snow.


From the outside, Country Dreams Farm may look average, but Monty-Provost and Weidle’s emphasis on supporting their neighbors is what their business is all about. Through this sense of community, the businesses benefit. So does The Adirondack Coast as a whole.

Issue: Winter/Spring 2019

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