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Asgaard Farm’s Bouncing Baby Goats

As soon as the golf cart pulled up in front of a grassy fenced-in lot, all I could see was the red shelter, resembling a horse trailer that’s usually hitched to vehicles. When the farmer killed the engine of the cart, tiny baby goats popped their heads out of the windows in the small shelter, curious about the noise. They pranced over the sunshine-splattered weeds and bundled together in a furry mass near the wire fence, eager to be closer to the visitors. They jostled each other in a group of plump bodies, wanting to be the first to the…

As soon as the golf cart pulled up in front of a grassy fenced-in lot, all I could see was the red shelter, resembling a horse trailer that’s usually hitched to vehicles. When the farmer killed the engine of the cart, tiny baby goats popped their heads out of the windows in the small shelter, curious about the noise.

They pranced over the sunshine-splattered weeds and bundled together in a furry mass near the wire fence, eager to be closer to the visitors. They jostled each other in a group of plump bodies, wanting to be the first to the fence and to be touched by human fingers. Their wide-eyed glimpses make you feel important because they are so curious about you. The warm summer sun lit up their rough fur in shades of gold, onyx and tanned leather, while glistening their tiny horns to resemble dotted buds on their heads.

Buzzine flies flew annoyingly around their heads, but that didn’t seem to bother the kids, who would eventually grow up to produce the milk used in the decadent cheeses that Asgaard produces. While touring the farm, visitors can see and pet the young goats, especially during their Annual “Kidding Day” in April. These baby goats were a sweet surprise at Asgaard Farm, which I wrote about for the latest issue.

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